Interpretation in the non-institution field – there will be a future

There is much information about interpreting for international organizations, but it is not  straightforward for the private market, since the situation of each region is different. Peter Sand, an experienced interpreter and prominent organizer, provides very useful insights into working on the private market (see http://lourdesderioja.com/2015/11/04/interpretation-in-the-non-institution-sector-is-there-a-future/).

Many newcomers seek to establish a presence on the market by knocking on the doors of the major international organizations – and it’s a nice choice. But it’s important to remember that , there is work outside of the UN and EU, and Peter explains the needs of that market and has some useful suggestions on how a freelance interpreter can raise his appeal to recruiters.

Frequently on the private market, an interpreter acting on the client’s behalf puts the team together and therefore recruits the interpreters. He or she is referred to as a consultant interpreter.

Getting a position as a new interpreter can be a daunting experience and here Peter – who has given so many newcomers an early break in the profession – explains how to make yourself appealing to recruiters, but he sets this suggestion within the context of how the interpreting market has developed over the last 30 year.

Whilst not wishing to publish any spoilers, Peter provides rational advice on not only relying on a single employer, on what languages to learn, on the importance of soft skills and on the importance of good preparation.

This short video shows that there is work outside of the international organizations. Just like translations (such as english to chinese translation), one should come out of the confortable place of just wating for the jobs to come, we should try to expand our own customers.